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are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very
for parthenogenesis, human biology, has it ever occurred? >> before technology, i'm sure technologically we can do all sorts of things. >> before technology. >> before technology do virgins -- how would i know? have i don't know, it seems to me if you're trying to establish the legitimacy of mary being a virgin one thing you would want to inquire is if it's ever happened independently of mythology and technology. >> well, i would wonder how i'd have access to that information. there is -- >> well, you're among all those boston scholars. what do you do in recreation, don't you ask questions like -- >> no, that tends not to be one of the things we talk about. with my grandmother, yes. with scholars, no. >> so you come down on the side that it was a true virgin birth, correct? >> i think it's very clear that the gospel writers thought so. appear we have no information with which to dispute them. i'm willing to go with it. >> may i say one more thing on this point? one of the things that the gospel writers do and matthew and luke in particular of the four that we have, is that they turn to using the bible
and technology and invention and art and science come which no other primate has done. very simple example of primates creating tools for using language, but it was indefinitely expandable hierarchical fashion. >> host: so you're thinking of the main functions of the neo cortex has been this high-level functions such as decision-making, inhibiting and proper actions. i mean, the neo cortex is a huge number of things. >> guest: it does lots of things that high on both levels and uses the same algorithm. i've recognized the ages of objects for crossfires ofa and obvious functions that he got at the high-level, how to recognize and say she's pretty but that was funny. it exists at the highest level of the conceptual hierarchy. one powerful piece of evidence that came out was what happens to be one, a region of the neo cortex of the optic nerve stillson, generally the process is a very primitive pattern and images, like the ages of objects. so this low-level, simple patterns. what happens to it and it congenitally blind person? it actually gets taken over by the frontal cortex to help that pro
to things they lost attention of in the first term. i think there are limited areas where the technology and the process of institutionalizing some of these practices can drive the train, to mix metaphors. as we discussed before, once you have white house logs coming out on a regular basis, it is hard not to seek proposals about standardizing the handling of foia request across agencies. we should put on line all foia requests. in this era of big data and big storage, i cannot see any reason why this cannot be done fairly cheaply. it has not happened. maybe some of those and that is happening on a small scale can build up some -- maybe some of those advances happening on a small-scale can build up some momentum. those of the small scale advances that i think are plausible to see happening in becoming four years. >> in the united kingdom, they have a functioning version of the foia model called what do they know? it is fascinating how they are able to make this information available in ways we are working toward now. we are going to open up to questions from the audience. before we do so,
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
as to whether or not we were following the technology. >> you mean speaking into something and have it automatic to dictate into english? >> well yes but on a more professional level, a particular software application developed. (off mic) >> the best thing is to have an interpreter. >> commissioner kingsley: a real person, absolutely. thank you very much. >> commissioner chan? >> commissioner chan: in terms of the reference to psas, says we are televised, we can educate the public on how to make it was reported you are involved in domestic violence. can you describe what the issues were, and how we can collaboratively address the issue? here is how it works. when there's a problem you go to the department or the commission and we address it. >> one thing that sandra had spoken about in our workshop is that there was an issue where psa may not have known severity of the walk-in who had some type of an issue. prior to me get in there. if you have an issue, and you don't speak, don't leave. the last thing we want to do is have the person leave. if this is impractical emerge
with this technology that can be scaled up into eco districts and community scale systems, campus-type systems where in those situations when the water is reused and the numbers are much higher, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000 gallons a day, imagine the savings on that that you're getting. you're not purchasing freshwater and you're not using the sewer and being charged appropriately. this wastewater processing and reuse technology is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 million gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we're thinking about building a building. that building is going to hold our operations c
inserts forhe distric >> in the district, there are certain industries that we foc on. technology is one ofhose. it is part of the mayor's five- year plan to make d.c. a technolology hub. that wou be industry y we wod certainllook at. e challenge is that the presidenentill say theevenueue increases and the president wants to raise the tax on the upper i income of $250,0,000 and above. there is a bitit of a challenge with that cause that can hurt small business entrepreneurs. we've got to take a brereak but when w we come back, we will do our number of ththe week bu first, i want to talk to you abouwhether small businesses are lining up against some of the big corporations. state-owned for more. -- stay tuned fo you won't take my life. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop mother-to-child trsmission. our employees and theheir families are part of the fight. and we're winning. at chevron nigeria,e haveven't had a reported case in 12 years. aids is strong. aids is strong. but we are stronger. and aids... ♪ ♪ aids is going
in fuel efficiency with traditional technology that you get your money back in two to three years. that's a winning proposition to the american consumer. >> me let me ask you about something else. most auto companies market to men, and yet women are making the lion's share of financial decisions. how come the auto sector isn't marketing to women? is your industry behind the times? >> our industry is behind the times in some ways, maria. our data shows 60% of women are deciding what finally happens. they are brilliant and let the men think they have decided but at the end of the day it is the women that has decided. i will tell you what has changed. in the digital world of today, women or men can do their research and their negotiating from their ied pad, mobile phone or home computer. women are very comfortable in that environment. really like the fact that they are now in control of the negotiation, rather than the old scheme where they have to come in to the dealership and jump through all of the hoops. i'm optimistic that a transformation is underway in auto may havetive retail that
society had generated technology and political networks that seemed to have conquered the globe. at this point, it was not only possible to go around the world. it had become a poplar past time. representation of doing a circumnavigation became playful, entizing -- enticing even joy us. there were costs. not all of them hidden. there seemed to be hidden glories making an swing around the planet. over the 20th century and now to the 21st century. the confidence has given way to doubt. technology logically now reforms of travel especially airplane and rocket propelled safe travel -- safe 19th century. equally, it's now clear that imperialism ha smoothed way for early under political and social conditions that would be unwise and unjust. above all, there's a growing sense of the planet as again beginning to bite back or slug us off. now that the environmental cost have begun to hunt us. we live with all three legacies of around the world travel. a reemerging fear that the planet could slug us off. continuing confident we might be able to generate technologies and political alliance
, one of which is directing the department of technology to host quarterly radio communication stakeholder meetings with the department of emergency management, sfmta, the public utilities commission, police, fire, and the motorola bay with staff to ensure there is clear and consistent communication about the status of the current and future planned radio communication projects, and directing the sfmta to provide regular reports back to coit and their subcommittees on the project -- on the progress of this project. in addition, in terms of the regular projects for the city, coit has directed the department of technology to do a study as there is not a plan for the current facilities, the condition of those facilities, and recommendations on how to proceed for other city departments' requirements, technical specifications, timing and a budget for the rest of the city to move forward for their -- to upgrade their radio and data communications. i would also note that the regional motorola bay width system regarding that project in february of 2012, the u.s. congress enacted the mi
. want and we have game-changing technological skranss that allow us to do much better care, cancer care of patients. >> what is the game-changing technology? what's handed -- you say this has happened really in the last five years. >> well, there have been major events. what's unusual about this event in science history is it's occurred in a narrow window and across a very broad front. it's not one technology. it's the fact that we can sequence genomes, your entire genome profile in a few hours with a few hundred dollars which took billions of dollars and a decade. we have the ability to analyze those data through very statistical computations structures and artificial intelligence. >> so if i look at it. you show me a machine that now sequences dnas, the size of a large refrigerator. that is now more powerful than -- much more powerful than a machine five years ago? >> well, that machine in nine days, a 24/7 run, one machine could exceed the data generation of all of the machines in the u.s. in the year 2007. >> you also talk about how computing has become not only faster but much more
it comes about and if it is established, how to deal with it. and we have game changing technological advances that allow us to do much better care, accurate care of cancer patients. >> what is the game changing technology? what's happened? and you say this has happened really in the last five years? >> there have been major events and what's unusual about this period in science history is that it's occurred in a narrow window and across a very broad front. so it's not one technology, it's the fact that we can sequence genomes, the entire tumor profile in a few hours for a few hundred dollars what took billions of dollars and a decde aid, question have the -- >> if i look at just to understand that advance in computing. you showed me a machine that now sequences dna, it's the side of a large refrigerator. that is now more powerful than, much more powerful than a machine just five years ago? >> well, that machine in nine days a 24/7 run, one machine, could exceed the data generation of all of the machines in the united states in the year 2007. >> you also talked about how computing has
that certainly san francisco sits in the seat of such technological developments that are really evolving and reshaping the world on so many fronts, biotech, biomedical, engineering feats. will could not understand why we could not board and eight with the technology available, state-of-the-art information system. for our citizens. thank you very much. i am very excited. it seems as though we are exponentially improving. i don't expect that we will wait another 10 years for similar reports. i am expecting that certainly within the next year we will be 10 steps further ahead. a few years ago it would've taken longer. i am very excited about this and excited that we can share this discussion with the police department commission. as far as the development of justice. thank you very much to all of that been involved. very critical. >> commissioner kingsley? >> ms. young, thank you very much for your report. it is very interesting. some of the questions i had have been addressed by commissioner schwatz's comments. i wanted more clarity around the timing and history of this. is 2012
'm not with technology in cars and as long as they don't give you speeding tickets automatilly when there are no cops around. >> and wait a minute. >> with the technology. >> wait a minute, todd, there's no transparency, no rules, no privacy, guaranteed. isn't this-- >> yeah, you say, it's watching your every move and the government is going to try to tell everybody, this is going to improve the trancecation putting. don't forget about the bridge collapse on i-35 and now you're talking about all of these bridges and hearing frail they are andovernment officials say we need to raise money to improve this. it's the fear facr and so we have to be prepared for it. >> julian? >> jonas is right on erything he stated about the safety factor and secondly, idea that you would use this for a gas tax, that's silly since we have a gas tax and third thing the thing you really have to wch out for. collection of the data to mon advertise it, the kinds of things you buy and where you go. the data you have to have strict rules. >> we have that with progressive insurance and the box that tells you where you are and t
on insuring that we get it right when it comes to technology, making sure we have a trained work force so that we can be the job creators and the folks that seem incomes rise -- see incomes rise. when we talk to candidates, we go for the job creators. >> when you look specifically to the 2014 elections, especially in the midwestern states where republicans have a pretty large victories in 2010, what is your overarching argument against those republican governors? they have led to charges that that anger the democratic base. will that be the basis of your message to unseating some of those governors? >> here is the state that produces the automobiles for america that with out president obama and the bailout of the automobile industry probably would not be in business right now. you have the governor down there institutional right to work policies that are against the interest of 30% of every living person in michigan. this is a nutty stuff. they focus on ticking away women's rights, standing for the most extreme elements of the tea party that got rejected. huge opportunities for the democr
hatx a public api or some equivalent. we don't want to be held hostage by a vendor or by technology. this data belongs to our constituents. we are simply stewards of it. in closing, i want to thank the hatchery, i want to thank our city leadership, mayor, as well as president chiu and partnering with us on this legislation. and i want to thank all of you in our community who have really done amazing things with this data. it's just a celebration of the good work that you're doing that we're here. open data would not exist without our community. so, with that, i'm going to actually hand it off to 100 plus to do a really quick demo and then we're going to do a little q & a and we'll have them come up next. >> 100 plus, we're based here in san francisco. we are interested in small healthy behaviors, ways to be healthy that don't involve going to the gym. we created a system where we recommend hops or help opportunities. these are little activities and places that are seed by users and served to other users based on location. and we used open data to seed our entire system. so, we input
in the newer in future. it's a new technology that allows a person to read text messages on a lens. the lens uses wireless technology to receive instant messages and images from cell phones and computers. the technology could be available to consumers in a couple of years. >> let's get one last check on the weather with leigh glaser. >> leigh: back east, the first snows of the season getting ready to hit the great l towards minneapolis. 33 degrees tomorrow. they're expecting six inches of snow. denver also, tricky travel. snow expected. 24 degrees and rain in seattle, 46 expected high. now, if you're traveling across california, remember that dense fog throughout the sawn -- san joaquin valley tomorrow morning. by tomorrow afternoon wi you should start to see sunshine. l.a. very warm tomorrow. 70 degrees. palm springs, 74. high pressure building in, bringing us offshore winds and also into southern california so red flag warning is up for the l.a. basin, ventura county, the mountains there, as well as san fernando valley, santa monica. until tuesday, and they're expecting very strong winds t
by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data offic
look next. all energy development comes with some risk, but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> 5%, that's the number of cases the supreme court argues to hear -- agrees to hear out of all the ones appealed to it. and now same-sex debate will be part of that small group of cases. but the questions are swirling now. who will the court hear arguments from? will it come down strongly and clearly for or against gay marriage or will it rule narrowly, sending the cases back to lower courts for further deliberation? attorney ka
important technological changes. obviously there was steam. steam have been around for generation or more. the application of universal use of steam and warships both on the blockade and those attempting to run the blockades, rifled guns just as rifled muskets. rifled artillery extended the range and accuracy of the ship can it. thereby elevating the impact of warships over guns ashore. going into the civil war the general notion was 10 guns ashore will defeat 10 guns upload every time. mainly because they don't sink. but with the new rifle, ordnance and explosive shells changes the balance of the. and, of course, the one that everybody recalls is armor. ship armor. we talked last time i think about that. the famous battle. and even the emergence of the suffering. so technologically there's all this going on. but also, and you mentioned manpower, the size of the navy dramatically -- were used to -- 16,000, at sea, they community began with 42 ships. the confederacy began for practical persons -- purposes with known to both are dramatically expanding the size, and that means bringing more
. >> the definition of an iphone could be very different in the newer in future. it's a new technology that allows a person to read text messages on a lens. the lens uses wireless technology to receive instant messages and images from cell phones and computers. the technology could be available to consumers in a couple of years. >> let's get one last check on the weather with leigh glaser. >> leigh: back east, the first snows of the season getting ready to hit the great lakes, towards minneapolis. 33 degrees tomorrow. they're expecting six inches of snow. denver also, tricky travel. snow expected. 24 degrees and rain in seattle, 46 expected high. now, if you're traveling across california, remember that dense fog throughout the sawn -- san joaquin valley tomorrow morning. by tomorrow afternoon wi you should start to see sunshine. l.a. very warm tomorrow. 70 degrees. palm springs, 74. high pressure building in, bringing us offshore winds and also into southern california so red flag warning is up for the l.a. basin, ventura county, the mountains there, as well as san fernando valley, santa monica.
've always been at the forefront of anything that could help us from the technology world. we got the database together back in the early '80s and were one of the first to go on to a computer system. so once you got -- that was, we wrapped our mind around that project, then we were able to make the store more profitable. but over the years, um, most recently is that in order to diversify we started our own digital book-on-demand business called the troy bookmakers where we make books. we literally physically make books. we, um, we take the manuscript, we format it into a book, we print the pages, we dip it in glue, we trim it up, slap a cover on it, and we make beautiful books. for our local authors that want to self-publish and also for some of the, you know, for some of the professors that want to do textbooks, for people that want to do family cookbook, you name it. but we've stayed right at the cutting edge of digital printing technology. and the other avenue that we've gone down to to stay on top of things is we started our own publishing company called staff picks press. and
. innovation and technology has made it possible for the traffickers to recruit their victims. internet has transformed the landscape of human trafficking. the san francisco police department has adopted a victim centered philosophy which prevents victims from being treated like perpetrators. we work closely with advocacy groups such as asian-pacific legal outreach in numerous volunteer specifically trained in helping the victims. partnership with these advocates ensures that the victims have the resources and assistance to rebuild their lives. a -- is a law enforcement tool that allows victims report crimes without fear of deportation. a u visa is a temporary four-year visa. -- has been designated to issue the visa is by reviewing the applicant's background. the final determination is made by the united states customs and immigration service. in 2011, we received 318 requests for u visas. this year we expect to review 994 cases. the special victims unit leads the way setting the standard for best practices in law enforcement. tvu has several members that our instructors who t
the technology. the 2 million placeholder could be used for one or two things. we can either go bigger on some of the investments that we are making the existing corridor, for example more stop enhancements or more next bus information. or we could look at doing an additional corridor, the rapid network. those are the two things that we are working on now, and need to also work with fta, the founding partner and see what they are interested in. >> okay, thank you. >> >> that was your presentation? thank you for that. let's open it up for public comment. any member of the comment that would like to comment come forward. seeing none, we close public comment. (gavel) motion made and seconded to move forward. >> colleagues any new items to introduce? public comment on item 11. new items. seeing none, close public comment. (gavel) general public comment, item 12. we close public comment, 12. last item. we are adjourned colleagues.
the technology that they have and do police predictable policing and getting them the tools and the support from the rest of the city that they can do better predictive policing when it comes to crime patterns in the city and what is going on, but the most important part and you will hear this from the chief, from deanna and myself is the community organizing. that the strength of any program is investment in our people and that means organizing our communities, faith base communities and different organizations, the tenants right here in sunny dale, the residents here in this valley, all around mclaren park for example and get them organized and working with the community organizations that we fund, with our city department including first five and our human services department, our health department and others all engaged in the same direction with our faith base community to make sure we're working on all the programs and signal to people violence is not the answer. that we have a lot of great programs. that we want our kids to grow up and feel they have hope. whether or not they have par
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help us from the technology world. we got the database together back in the early 80s and we were one of the first to go on the -- and we wrap their mind around that project and we were able to make the store more profitable. but over the years, most recently in order to diversify, we started our own digital book on demand business called the toy bookmakers, where we make books, literally physically make books. we take the manuscript. we formatted into a book. we print the pages. we did that include. we trim it up, slap a cover on it and we make beautiful books. for our local authors that want to self-publish and also for some of the you know, some of the professors for textbooks, for people that want to do a famous cookbook. we stay right at the cutting-edge of print technology and the other avenue we have gone down to to stay on top of things as we started our own publishing company called fast success. the inspiration for it was of course if we found a manuscript that we loved, we knew that we could sell it, so we just had to find the right author, the right manuscript and so we ar
in a rapid manner. on the technology side we are grappling with how to enhance dispatch. we are working closely with lisa hoffman to have a system that identifies the language skills of bilingual officers immediately and in real-time so that they can be more readily dispatched to the scene and it gives equally important information which is to know if there aren't bilingual officers, waiting on the scene, and can move onto the next level, the language line system. we are working on how do we get officers who want to be bilingual, who want to be certified as bilingual officers, how do they more rapidly get the certification process in place? officers can be certified in mandarin, cantonese, spanish, russian. we are hoping and working with other divisions within the city to get the process moving more quickly. on the street patrol officers, they're using their own cell phones to call language line. on a real level of equipment, officers need a better way to ask his language line. we are working with the department and think outside of the box. bilingual officers use digit
the cold when you're not there. now get the advanced technology of adt starting at just $99 and save $300. with adt, you get 24/7 fast response monitoring that helps protect you from burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. plus remote access to your home. even control your thermostat to help save energy and money. get adt installed starting at just $99. that's a $300 savings. you may even save up to 20% on your homeowners insurance. for everything that matters most. adt. always there. >>> welcome back, everybody. it's time for "sunday house call." joining us, dr. mark skiing siegel, associate professor of med. and vice chairman of the department of urology at the mount sinai medical facility here. >> good morning. >> good to see you. we begin with a shocking report that has to do with the representative head injuries. how dangerous they can be. the researchers found substantial new evidence linking repeat concussion to say permanent brain injury. dr. siegel, when you are a kid you get your bell running and if you don't
to using the in digital technology and were very excited about the transition because it makes it faster, cheaper, more efficient to get it good reading material when they need it. the service is designed for the government to be sure that people have equitable access to these material in the spirit of public libraries in this country. we have over 15,000 libraries. with more public libraries than donald. we had a chance of a service like this to be sure everyone has a chance to be well-informed citizen come which obviously is most critical, but also to enjoy the rewards of being able to read great novels and great literature and be part of the world around us. we call ourselves the talking book and braille library. we could probably call ourselves a talking book library in part because braille is not as popular as it used to be. braille is expensive to produce, it uses a lot of paper. it is a paper-based technology. new addition just came out in the past couple weeks. pretty amazing and pretty important reference tool. in braille, 107 volume, 107 volumes. i don't know how many, 20, 30 s
but we have done it. once lead certified the civic center retrofit strategies and technology can serve as a model to other cities and i would like to take this opportunity to recognize leaders from all the country and our world that have made great strides in environmental stewardships themselves and have joined in this conference including mayor fong from oakland, mayor kevin johnson from sacramento, mayor cory booker from new ark and hif a applause and support his city with. [applause] i would also like to welcome former governor from new york patacky and thank you for your leadership. over the next days you will learn about sustainable practices. you will network with the greatest minds in the industry and enjoy your time here. be thoughtful. be creative and go out and lead the befl energy and green policies for the rest of the country. congratulations and thanks for being here in san francisco. [applause] >> my name is byron webb. i'm a development director with the port and i want to welcome to heron park. it was built in the wetlands in the bay view community adjacent to
the energy crisis. and a few years, nearly five on my machine technologies that transform petroleum industry in the past five years, the horizontal tracking and other developments that have made it possible with a much smaller surface reached much larger tropes of fuel than in the past. the green energy sources that consumed the most valuable part of the global environment, which is the surface of the earth, air above all soils on the surface of the earth. you know, you have cells in windmills and biofuels and all of these systems waste what is important, which is the surface it ears, while ignoring the almost infinite tropes of energy below the surface of the earth that can be reached with a very small footprint of usable land. >> what is all true wisdom and how does that fit into the capitalist system? >> all true wisdom is an orientation towards the needs of others. i believe capitalism is intrinsically altruistic. that is to say that capitalism is based on making investment without any assurance that others will respond to god. capitalist investments only work if they respond imaginative
in the journal environmental science and technology found stuffing in more than 100 sophomore f hu00 the country found that 85% contained potentially hazard downs chemicals. >> they're coming out of the couches into air and dropping into dust. >> reporter: these chemicals were first used to meet requirements in california saying that the upholstery must sustain a flame for 15 seconds. among the chemicals found where were pbdes, voluntarily phased out in 2004 after the epa expressed concern that they were toxic to both humans and the environment. and a toxic ban from children's sleep wear in the 1970s. an environmental advocacy group found the tests it commissioned found high levels of tris in 16 upholstered products. but the midwesteamerican chemis counsel say that it provides time -- a furniture trade group says it's not aware of any evidence including in the sofa study linking the retard ands in furniture as a home health problem. additional research is needed for the sole purpose of meeting california's strict standards. the treadway's say for them, finding this ecofriendly douch was worth it
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are the neficiaries of a massive technology bubbland the markets. >> plants and reduced the capital gas tax by 30percent. he increased the income tax by 10%, but the huge surge in revenues under clinton came through the capital gains tax cut, not from the income-tax increase. lou: you and i have do what the repblicans, perhaps too often. we talk about the economics of it, the theory of it, if you will, the extraction of t, but but the realitys the republican party has not come up with a rejoinder, a respnse to a, if you will, a socialist redistributionist president who right now claims thefield is on because there is no other standard flying over that field. there is a spker of the house to is simply saying, this is not right. you know, we are not at the table and complaining, but not, not engaging. >> i think we have got to engage the argument. we cannot win the argument while acknowledging that an increase in tax rates would increase revenues and all. it will just today the top 1 percent are paying about 40 percent of the income tax. the top 25 percent are paying 87% of the income tax. it does
technology out and that's what i wanted to talk about today. l.e.d. lights, a little more expensive but you can string than three strands together and be more creative but you can look at battery operated lights to keep them safer. the idea is, if you're plugging things in, make sure it's safe. >> do they run as hot? >> they don't run as hot, they're more durable so should last you a longer period of time but again it all comes back to making sure you're inspecting things to make sure they're safe. >> it looks like the -- >> many of these are indoor and outdoor rated. some of the lights are not meant to be outdoors. same with extension cords. make sure they're rated to go outdoor, able to take the load you're looking for. ask people in the stores you go to to give you advice on what you should buy for your application. >> and as far as leaving your lights on. every year we do stories about christmas tree fires. is your best tip to protect yourself from your tree going up in flames? >> the big thing is to make sure you're putting fire retardant things on your tree and looking for -- if you h
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